Jibs, Seafood Served With a River View, to Open in Hudson Yards

With the vibe of a seafood shack but far grander, this outdoor newcomer to Hudson Yards, overlooking the river, seats 200 at a bar area with counters and high-tops, and on a dining deck with captain’s chairs and picnic tables. It will be a year-round affair, with a roof covering that retracts, removable side panels and heaters. The owners, Cobi Levy, Will Makris and Thatcher Shultz, hauled in a couple of shipping containers for the kitchen and bar, covered them with shingles and strung them with used buoys for which they spent months scavenging local shorefront dealers. The chef, David Ladner, who worked in Rhode Island and Cambridge, Mass., has an extensive menu of seafood specialties, including raw bar items, baked clams, steamed mussels, fish and chips, grilled black sea bass, grilled lobster, lobster rolls two ways, and lobster grilled cheese. A hot dog, cheeseburger, chicken fingers, salads, mac and cheese, and a number of vegetable preparations round out the choices. There’s a blueberry buckle for dessert and a full bar. All the seafood is listed with its geographic source. (Opens Thursday)

Then, coming to Hudson Yards in November is Kamasu by Kissaki for omakase lunches, dinners, and food to go from a window on the second level of 20 Hudson Yards, the shopping building. Also in November will be ANA at Hudson Yards, a restaurant, bar, market and wine shop by Anna Castellani of Foragers, DeKalb Market and the Hugh, with the chef Eyal Shani of Miznon. (It will replace Citarella on the second floor.) A branch of Mr. Shani’s Miznon moved into the Belcampo space in the complex last year. Other restaurants open now are Mercado Little Spain, Milos and Milos Wine Bar, Peak and Peak Lounge, Queensyard and Queensyard Café, Wild Ink, the Tavern, Fuku, Shake Shack and Sweetgreen. Hudson Yards Grill opens Thursday.

Hudson Yards Plaza, 11th Avenue and 33rd Street, 212-581-7070, jibsny.com.

Given top billing at this new barbecue restaurant that’s up on the fifth floor of a Koreatown building are names like gopchang (beef small intestine), daechang (large intestine) and makchang (beef entrails). These Korean delicacies can be had grilled, in casseroles or stews. Some of the preparations are well spiced, come in sweet-and-sour sauces, or can be ordered with additions like rice cakes and fried rice. Bulgogi, barbecued lamb chops, kalbi, bibimbap and kimchi stew are some non-offal offerings. Starters include mandoo dumplings, japchae and pajeon. (Thursday)

22 West 32nd Street, 646-850-0145, jongrogopchang.com.

Group KFF, based in Manhattan’s Koreatown, has something for everyone. In addition to its restaurants, Dons Bogam and Jongro BBQ, and quite the opposite of the new offal house, Jongro Gopchang (above), is this mini food hall in Brooklyn with four jazzy mass-market brands. There’s Jongro Rice Hotdog, with various fillings, often wrapped in fries or noodles, crisped in a rice batter and traced with sauces like Sriracha mayonnaise. Mochi Mochi Donut sells rosette-shaped rice flour confections with neon icings in several flavors. Croffle Haus serves croissants mashed in a waffle iron and served with toppings like cheese or sweet icing. EggLab has gooey scrambled egg sandwiches. In addition to those brands, there’s also coffee from Brooklyn Roasting Company. The company projects speedy expansion of Afternoon, with others coming next month to Flushing, Queens, the East Village in Manhattan and more locations in the works. (Thursday)

148 North Seventh Street (Berry Street), Williamsburg, Brooklyn, no phone, afternoonplace.com.

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